Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk project (HEAR)

Bradybaena similaris
(Bradybaenidae)

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Taxonomy & nomenclature Impacts Host/vector of these species Distribution Full-text articles

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Bradybaena similaris is native to east and southeast Asia. 


Taxonomy & nomenclature

Bradybaena similaris information from ITIS
The Integrated Taxonomic Information System ITIS provides authoritative taxonomic information on Bradybaena similaris, as well as other plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.


Impacts

Angiostrongylus cantonensis: Wikipedia
Information on Angiostrongylus cantonensis is available on Wikipedia. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasitic nematode (roundworm) which causes angiostrongyliasis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. The nematode commonly resides in the pulmonary arteries of rats, giving it the nickname the rat lungworm. Snails are the primary intermediate hosts, where larvae develop until they are infective. Humans are incidental hosts of this roundworm, and may become infected through ingestion of larvae in raw or undercooked snails or other vectors, or from contaminated water and vegetables. The larvae are then transported via the blood to the central nervous system (CNS), where they are the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, a serious condition that can lead to death or permanent brain and nerve damage. Identified in 1964, angiostrongyliasis is an infection of increasing public health importance as globalization contributes to the geographic spread of the disease.


Host/vector of these species

Angiostrongylus cantonensis: Wikipedia
Information on Angiostrongylus cantonensis is available on Wikipedia. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a parasitic nematode (roundworm) which causes angiostrongyliasis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. The nematode commonly resides in the pulmonary arteries of rats, giving it the nickname the rat lungworm. Snails are the primary intermediate hosts, where larvae develop until they are infective. Humans are incidental hosts of this roundworm, and may become infected through ingestion of larvae in raw or undercooked snails or other vectors, or from contaminated water and vegetables. The larvae are then transported via the blood to the central nervous system (CNS), where they are the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, a serious condition that can lead to death or permanent brain and nerve damage. Identified in 1964, angiostrongyliasis is an infection of increasing public health importance as globalization contributes to the geographic spread of the disease.


Distribution

Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy (2000) View info about Adobe Acrobat PDF format
The status of invasive plants, vertebrates, arthropods, molluscs, and crustaceans, and options for a regional invasive species strategy for the South Pacific are presented in this series of articles from the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme, 2000.


Full-text articles

Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy
South Pacific Regional Environmental Programme (SPREP). Sherley, Greg (ed.) . 2000. Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy. Apia, Samoa: South Pacific Regional Environment Programme. ISBN: 982-04-0214-X.


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The Hawaiian Ecosystems at Risk (HEAR) project was historically funded by the Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) through PIERC (USGS) with support from HCSU (UH Hilo). More details are available online. Pacific Basin Information Node (PBIN) National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII)

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